survivalbannerweb.jpg

Earthquake preparations

Home
December 2013
Webcams
Severe weather alerts
The rough guides
Global Emergency Disaster organisations
Current Events and situation reports
Media Centre
Disaster Plan
Disaster Supply Kit
Long Term Survival
Cold weather preparation
Are you prepared for a 'Jericho' type event?
Flight or Fight
Contents
UK National Preparedness month
Howard Bio
Emergency Preparedness Workshop
Emergency and Disaster Preparedness Publications
Outdoor survival publications
Latest events
Tornado Preparedness
Tsunami Preparation
NBC preparedness
Flooding Preparedness
Hurricane Preparedness
Katrina publications
Hurricane Watch
Interactive Media
A-Z Contents
Global disaster organisations
Volcano Preparation
Community contact
Earthquake preparations
PETS IN DISASTERS
SOS Book and CD
Safe Survival CD contents
Monthly articles
Global weather roundup
SAFE OUTDOORS SURVIVAL MAGAZINE
SOS GUIDLINES
Latest Updates
Dryad Bushcraft
About Me
Photo Album
Locations Photo Album
My Resume
Useful Links
Contact Me
Emergency Preparedness
Water storage
Emergency Preparations
Global disaster watch

Advice and safety precautions in the event of earthquakes

EARTHQUAKE PREPARATION

 

We have mentioned in many of our articles at ambilac, the build up and reaction of mother earth to the many on going (and increasing) global events. These increasing events are part of a scenario that is due on this timeline, mainly due to the increasing solar activity and the effects of the many incoming solar system objects. To understand why this is occurring at this time, please take time to read over a few of our articles on the above sites, and in particular our recent article HERE COMES THE SUN

http://ambilac-uk.tripod.com/ambilacukcopy/id30.html

 

However, with the increase in global earthquakes (eg Bam Iran) and the constant seismic activity in the Wyoming (Yellowstone) area, it is vital to be aware of the safe preparations one can implement to avoid and minimise damage.

 

Below I have collated some useful preparation tips, prior, during and post quake events. In the event of recent Yellowstone activity

http://www.earthmountainview.com/yellowstone/yellowstone.htm#LATEST

I would seriously consider implementing preparation training imminently.

 

In addition, while I am not one for creating a panic scenario, in light of global events, my personal take on the Yellowstone scenario, is to seriously consider making plans and be prepared for major evacuation. Due to the possible strength of the event, I would suggest to move at least 450-600 miles away from the epicentre. Read over the safe survival tips on this site following the many useful links that I have provided for your safe survival

 

The following are general preparation and precautionary tips, each area may have additional plans and contingencies.

 

The first plan of action is to organise an out-of-town contact in order that your  family may call/or e-mail to check on each other should a disaster occur. The contact should live far enough away that they would be unlikely to be directly affected by the same event. Ensure every household member has that contact's, Number/cell phone etc and e-mail address. Your family and friends should be aware that if telephones are not working, they need to be patient and try again later or try e-mail.

2. Establish a meeting place.

Organise a predetermined meeting place away from your home this will save time and minimize confusion should your home be affected or the area evacuated. You may even want to make arrangements to stay with a family member or friend in case of an emergency. Be sure to include any pets in these plans, since pets are not permitted in shelters and some hotels will not accept them.

3. Assemble a disaster supplies kit.

In the event of a evacuation or are asked to "shelter in place," having some essential supplies on hand will make you and your family more comfortable. Prepare a disaster supplies (see below) kit in an easy-to-carry container such as a duffel bag or rucksack. Do not forget "special needs" items for any member of your household (infant formula or items for people with disabilities or older people), first aid supplies (including prescription medications), a change of clothing for each household member, a sleeping bag or bedroll for each, a battery powered radio or television and extra batteries, food, bottled water and tools. It is also a good idea to include some cash and copies of important family documents (birth certificates, passports and licenses) in your kit.

See lists below and follow the general guides I have placed within this survival site.

Copies of essential documents, such as birth and marriage certificates, insurance policies, life insurance beneficiary designations and a copy of your will-should also be kept in a safe location outside your home.

 

Check on the school emergency plan of any school-age children you may have.
You need to know if they will they keep children at school until a parent or designated adult can pick them up or send them home on their own. Be sure that the school has updated information about how to reach parents and responsible caregivers to arrange for pickup. And, ask what type of authorization the school may require to release a child to someone you designate, if you are not able to pick up your child. During times of emergency the school telephones may be overwhelmed with calls.

Additional information on preparing a disaster plane may be found in the links section below.

Tips from the Red Cross

 

If Disaster Strikes

  • Remain calm and be patient.
  • Follow the advice of local emergency officials.
  • Listen to your radio or television for news and instructions.
  • If the disaster occurs near you, check for injuries. Give first aid and get help for seriously injured people.
  • If the disaster occurs near your home while you are there, check for damage using a flashlight. Do not light matches or candles or turn on electrical switches. Check for fires, fire hazards and other household hazards. Sniff for gas leaks, starting at the water heater. If you smell gas or suspect a leak, turn off the main gas valve, open windows, and get everyone outside quickly.
  • Shut off any other damaged utilities.
  • Confine or secure your pets.
  • Call your family contactdo not use the telephone again unless it is a life-threatening emergency.

Check on your neighbours, especially those who are elderly or disabled

 

  • There can be significant numbers of casualties and/or damage to buildings and the infrastructure. So employers need up-to-date information about any medical needs you may have and on how to contact your designated beneficiaries.
  • Heavy law enforcement involvement at local, state and federal levels follows a terrorist attack due to the event's criminal nature.
  • Health and mental health resources in the affected communities can be strained to their limits, maybe even overwhelmed.
  • Extensive media coverage, strong public fear and international implications and consequences can continue for a prolonged period.
  • Workplaces and schools may be closed, and there may be restrictions on domestic and international travel.
  • You and your family or household may have to evacuate an area, avoiding roads blocked for your safety.
  • Clean-up may take many months.

Evacuation
If local authorities ask you to leave your home, they have a good reason to make this request, and you should heed the advice immediately. Listen to your radio or television and follow the instructions of local emergency officials and keep these simple tips in mind-

  1. Wear long-sleeved shirts, long pants and sturdy shoes so you can be protected as much as possible.
  2. Take your disaster supplies kit.
  3. Take your pets with you; do not leave them behind. Because pets are not permitted in public shelters, follow your plan to go to a relative's or friend's home, or find a "pet-friendly" hotel.
  4. Lock your home.
  5. Use travel routes specified by local authoritiesdon't use shortcuts because certain areas may be impassable or dangerous.
  6. Stay away from downed power lines.

Listen to local authorities.
Your local authorities will provide you with the most accurate information specific to an event in your area. Staying tuned to local radio and television, and following their instructions is your safest choice.

If you're sure you have time:

  • Call your family contact to tell them where you are going and when you expect to arrive.
  • Shut off water and electricity before leaving, if instructed to do so. Leave natural gas service ON unless local officials advise you otherwise. You may need gas for heating and cooking, and only a professional can restore gas service in your home once it's been turned off. In a disaster situation it could take weeks for a professional to respond.

Prepare a disaster supplies kit for home and car:

Please use this guide in conjunction with the other emergency supply kit mentioned on this site, in particular, what to do in the event of power cuts etc.

Assemble disaster supplies including:

Battery-powered radio, flashlight, and plenty of extra batteries
At least three gallons of water per person, preferably more
Canned food and can opener
First aid kit
Essential medications
Tools and instructions to shut off utilities
Sturdy shoes and work gloves
Sanitation supplies
Fire extinguisher

Keep essentials, such as a flashlight and sturdy shoes, by your bedside.

 

Water

  • Store water in plastic containers such as soft drink bottles. Avoid using containers that will decompose or break, such as milk cartons or glass bottles. A normally active person needs to drink at least two quarts of water each day. Hot environments and intense physical activity can double that amount. Children, nursing mothers, and ill people will need more.
  • Store one gallon of water per person per day.
  • Keep at least a three-day supply of water per person (two quarts for drinking, two quarts for each person in your household for food preparation/sanitation).*

Food

  • Store at least a three-day supply of non-perishable food. Select foods that require no refrigeration, preparation or cooking, and little or no water. If you must heat food, pack a can of sterno. Select food items that are compact and lightweight. Include a selection of the following foods in your Disaster Supplies Kit:
  • Ready-to-eat canned meats, fruits, and vegetables
  • Canned juices
  • Staples (salt, sugar, pepper, spices, etc.)
  • High energy foods
  • Vitamins
  • Food for infants
  • Comfort/stress foods

First Aid Kit
Assemble a first aid kit for your home and one for each car.

  • (20) adhesive bandages, various sizes.
  • (1) 5" x 9" sterile dressing.
  • (1) conforming roller gauze bandage.
  • (2) triangular bandages.
  • (2) 3 x 3 sterile gauze pads.
  • (2) 4 x 4 sterile gauze pads.
  • (1) roll 3" cohesive bandage.
  • (2) germicidal hand wipes or waterless alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
  • (6) antiseptic wipes.
  • (2) pair large medical grade non-latex gloves.
  • Adhesive tape, 2" width.
  • Anti-bacterial ointment.
  • Cold pack.
  • Scissors (small, personal).
  • Tweezers.
  • CPR breathing barrier, such as a face shield.

Non-Prescription Drugs

  • Aspirin or nonaspirin pain reliever
  • Anti-diarrhea medication
  • Antacid (for stomach upset)
  • Syrup of Ipecac (use to induce vomiting if advised by the Poison Control Center)
  • Laxative
  • Activated charcoal (use if advised by the Poison Control Center)

Tools and Supplies

  • Mess kits, or paper cups, plates, and plastic utensils*
  • Emergency preparedness manual*
  • Battery-operated radio and extra batteries*
  • Flashlight and extra batteries*
  • Cash or traveler's checks, change*
  • Non-electric can opener, utility knife*
  • Fire extinguisher: small canister ABC type
  • Tube tent
  • Pliers
  • Tape
  • Compass
  • Matches in a waterproof container
  • Aluminum foil
  • Plastic storage containers
  • Signal flare
  • Paper, pencil
  • Needles, thread
  • Medicine dropper
  • Shut-off wrench, to turn off household gas and water
  • Whistle
  • Plastic sheeting
  • Map of the area (for locating shelters)

Sanitation

  • Toilet paper, towelettes*
  • Soap, liquid detergent*
  • Feminine supplies*
  • Personal hygiene items*
  • Plastic garbage bags, ties (for personal sanitation uses)
  • Plastic bucket with tight lid
  • Disinfectant
  • Household chlorine bleach

Clothing and Bedding
*Include at least one complete change of clothing and footwear per person.

  • Sturdy shoes or work boots*
  • Rain gear*
  • Blankets or sleeping bags*
  • Hat and gloves
  • Thermal underwear
  • Sunglasses

Special Items

  • Remember family members with special requirements, such as infants and elderly or disabled persons

For Baby*

  • Formula
  • Diapers
  • Bottles
  • Powdered milk
  • Medications

For Adults*

  • Heart and high blood pressure medication
  • Insulin
  • Prescription drugs
  • Denture needs
  • Contact lenses and supplies
  • Extra eye glasses

Entertainment

  • Games and books

 

Know what to do when the shaking begins:

    DROP, COVER, AND HOLD ON! Move only a few steps to a nearby safe place. Stay indoors until the shaking stops and you’re sure it’s safe to exit. Stay away from windows. In a high-rise building, expect the fire alarms and sprinklers to go off during a quake.
    If you are in bed, hold on and stay there, protecting your head with a pillow.
    If you are outdoors, find a clear spot away from buildings, trees, and power lines. Drop to the ground.
    If you are in a car, slow down and drive to a clear place (as described above). Stay in the car until the shaking stops.

Identify what to do after the shaking stops:

Check yourself for injuries. Protect yourself from further danger by putting on long pants, a long-sleeved shirt, sturdy shoes, and work gloves.
Check others for injuries. Give first aid for serious injuries.
Look for and extinguish small fires. Eliminate fire hazards. Turn off the gas if you smell gas or think its leaking (remember, only a professional should turn it back on).
Listen to the radio for instructions.
Expect aftershocks. Each time you feel one, DROP, COVER, AND HOLD ON!
Inspect home for damage. Get everyone out if your home is unsafe.
Use the telephone only to report life-threatening emergencies.

 

 

How to Shelter-in-Place

At Home:

  • Close and lock all windows and exterior doors.
  • If you are told there is danger of explosion, close the window shades, blinds, or curtains.
  • Turn off all fans, heating and air conditioning systems.
  • Close the fireplace damper.
  • Get your family disaster supplies kit and make sure the radio is working.
  • Go to an interior room without windows that's above ground level. In the case of a chemical threat, an above-ground location is preferable because some chemicals are heavier than air, and may seep into basements even if the windows are closed.
  • Bring your pets with you, and be sure to bring additional food and water supplies for them.
  • It is ideal to have a hard-wired telephone in the room you select. Call your emergency contact and have the phone available if you need to report a life-threatening condition. Cellular telephone equipment may be overwhelmed or damaged during an emergency.
  • Use duct tape and plastic sheeting (heavier than food wrap) to seal all cracks around the door and any vents into the room.
  • Keep listening to your radio or television until you are told all is safe or you are told to evacuate. Local officials may call for evacuation in specific areas at greatest risk in your community.

At Work:

  • Close the business.
  • If there are customers, clients, or visitors in the building, provide for their safety by asking them to stay not leave. When authorities provide directions to shelter-in-place, they want everyone to take those steps now, where they are, and not drive or walk outdoors.
  • Unless there is an imminent threat, ask employees, customers, clients, and visitors to call their emergency contact to let them know where they are and that they are safe.
  • Turn on call-forwarding or alternative telephone answering systems or services. If the business has voice mail or an automated attendant, change the recording to indicate that the business is closed, and that staff and visitors are remaining in the building until authorities advise it is safe to leave.
  • Close and lock all windows, exterior doors, and any other openings to the outside.
  • If you are told there is danger of explosion, close the window shades, blinds, or curtains.

Have employees familiar with your buildings mechanical systems turn off all fans, heating and air conditioning systems. Some systems automatically

 

 

In Your Vehicle:

If you are driving a vehicle and hear advice to shelter-in-place on the radio, take these steps:

  • If you are very close to home, your office, or a public building, go there immediately and go inside. Follow the shelter-in-place recommendations for the place you pick described above.
  • If you are unable to get to a home or building quickly and safely, then pull over to the side of the road. Stop your vehicle in the safest place possible. If it is sunny outside, it is preferable to stop under a bridge or in a shady spot, to avoid being overheated.
  • Turn off the engine. Close windows and vents.
  • If possible, seal the heating/air conditioning vents with duct tape.
  • Listen to the radio regularly for updated advice and instructions.
  • Stay where you are until you are told it is safe to get back on the road. Be aware that some roads may be closed or traffic detoured. Follow the directions of law enforcement officials.

 

Pets in disasters

Please see separate article

 

Fore more detailed information, here are comprehensive links to in-depth guides.

 

Red cross ready for a quake?

http://www.earthchangestv.com/survival/rceq.htm

 

Red cross

http://www.redcross.org/

 

Red Cross Before disaster strikes

http://www.redcross.org/services/disaster/beprepared/financeprep.html

 

Shelter-in-place Fact Sheet

http://www.redcross.org/services/disaster/beprepared/shelterinplace.html

 

Urban search and rescue

http://www.fema.gov/usr/

 

FEMA are you ready guide

http://www.fema.gov/areyouready/

 

Homeland security

http://www.dhs.gov/dhspublic/

.

Live Seismic Internet server - updated every 30 minutes

Earthquake maps and useful information from ABAG

Advice for travellers

Red Cross Preparedness fact sheets

FEMA - Are you ready guide - covers all natural disasters and more

Enter supporting content here